Not far at all, Re: Far from the Tahrir dream, Toronto Globe & Mail, March 1, 2012

One year after the fall of Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak, the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces in Egypt is the only entity preventing the country from being taken over by the Muslim Brotherhood and other Islamists and plunging it into another Islamic dark age, from turning Egypt into an Islamic state governed by Islamic law, Sharia. In the year since Mubarak’s fall Egypt has had more or less free and fair parliamentary elections. Those elections were won by the Freedom and Justice Party and the Salafist al-Nour party, both of which are very clear in their intent to do exactly that.

If they do come to power Islam will reign supreme in the land and the consequences for the Egyptian people and the Middle East will be catastrophic. Aside from its brutal, violent, misogynistic nature and inbred hatred of Jews and other infidels which will no doubt lead to war in the region and perhaps beyond Islam has proven itself time and time again to be incapable of meeting a given societies economic needs. If you think there was real poverty in Egypt under Mubarak wait and see what happens if the Islamists come to power. If you think life in Egypt was regimented under Mubarak wait and see what happens if the Islamists come to power. If you think Islam dominated in Egypt under Mubarak wait and see what happens if Islamists come to power. If you think the plight of minorities in Egypt was unconscionable under Mubarak wait and see what happens if Islamists come to power. No one is saying that Egyptian’s lives were easy under Mubarak. They weren’t by any stretch of the imagination. For all his faults however he did keep the Islamists at bay and out of power and now that he is gone the task has fallen to the Supreme Council. If they fail Egypt really will be plunged into an Islamic dark age and the Egyptian people will have no one to blame except themselves.

The Tahrir dream lauded by the Western media and Western politicians (and so exagerrated and misunderstood by them too) was all about bringing freedom and democracy to Egypt, with turning Egypt into a secular, liberal, democratic state. It was never representative or reflected the wishes of the people however and only a very small percentage of Egyptians shared that dream. The rest dreamed something completely different and we are seeing more and more evidence of that every day as Islam and Islamists become more and more entrenched.

If the Islamists are kept out of power in Egypt and Egypt is kept from becoming an Islamic state it will be the Supreme Council that does it, not the starry eyed optimists who launched the democratic movement in Tahrir Square and totally misread the will of the Egyptian people.

If the Supreme Council does succeed Egypt may yet find itself part of the twenty-first century, to some degree at least. If it doesn’t it will find itself part of the seventh century from whence Islam came and where it still resides.

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